Can The Public Water System Ever Be Fixed? Probably Not

As we hear from all of those who stop by the spring, we are convinced that there are so many issues with our public water treatment facilities.  Our customers share their stories of why they come and more are telling us that they were driven here because they believe in the healing qualities of our water.  However, they also tell us that they no longer trust the water supply from their own town’s water system.

Your stories inspire us to do more outreach.  Beyond reaching out to the local residence  of Lynnfield, MA who  have been affected by discolored water that city officials think is “safe to drink,” we try to bring you stories  to share in your network about the challenges we face in finding safe drinking water.  It is a challenge.

In New Hampshire, there were 14 cases of Legionnaires’ disease from contaminated water systems at the Sands Resort at the end of July or beginning of August, including one person who died.  This contamination is circulated back through the public water system and treated with known strong chemicals like Chlorine.  We just do not believe that adding more chemicals to water is the best long term solution for bringing clean water to our faucets.  The truth is, that may never happen.

The cost for “fixing” Lynnfield’s water supply  was estimated to be from between $4 million (local fix) and $30 million (tie into the state water supply) and will take years.  We are  not even sure what “fixed” means because if it  just means the water is clear, we still cannot be sure of the chemicals still contained in it.  Also, the fix means that it even if the water was drinkable at the treatment plant, could it still be so after traveling miles in aging pipes?  The cost of replacing every pipe, up to the  point of where it comes out of the faucet would be cost prohibitive for any town like Lynnfield and there are THOUSANDS OF  TOWNS LIKE LYNNFIELD.

Drinking water, like what you find at our  spring in Lynnfield, comes from deep (we don’t even know how deep) within the earth.  The Pocahontas Spring is a gift that has found its way to the surface, through some miracle of nature, to your bottles that you fill here.  Those  who come to  our spring are just the beginning of a movement where people will be retrieving their own drinking water from a trusted source.  We cannot imagine a time in the foreseeable future where this  trend changes.

We keep our water affordable, available and pure.  Your coming to our spring reminds us of the trust you have instilled in us and the commitment we have made to the community … to the world.

Holding Public Officials Accountable For Clean Water

If the water crisis in Flint, Michigan taught us one thing, it was that we simply do no know what we are drinking out of the faucet.  But when the water has contaminates in it, who should be held responsible and how to they go about cleaning it up?

In Flint, the courts are getting involved and prosecutors are bringing cases against public officials for their role in supplying dirty water to residents.  As with many cases of corruption, it is not going to be about the people who contaminated the water, that occurred over a long period of neglect, it is going to be about the person who found out about it and covered it up.  In Michigan, public officials are concerned that they could be held accountable by our judicial system for their neglect.  It would send a strong message.

According to a report in the USA Today, an outbreak of Legionnaires in disease in Michigan killed 12 people as a result of contamination in the water supply:

Legionella bacteria can emerge through misting and cooling systems, triggering a severe form of pneumonia, especially in people with weakened immune systems. The state says there were 90 cases reported to Genesee County Health Department in 2014-15, including 12 deaths. More than half of the people had a common thread: They spent time at McLaren Hospital, which was on the Flint water system.

Our guess is that you have no idea who is in charge of the water supply that feeds your city water supply, their credentials, the treatment facility protocol, the chemical process they use to treat the water and the condition of the pipes that deliver the water to your tap.  It makes you want to go grab a bottled water, but hold on!

Things that we take for granted in life are some of the things that we need to question most.  According to American Prospect, 2015 study by the American Water Works Association found that if federal recommendations on water monitoring were actually followed, as many as 70 percent of water systems relying on lead service lines could be found to be unsafe … In some cases, utilities have failed to keep records of where lead service lines are even located.

Your water supply is important and the more you know about your water, the more you can make decisions about how it interacts with your family’s life.  We should all demand more from our officials, first by having them tell us what is in the water that we are drinking, then asking what actions are taking place to improve it.

The way that we hold people accountable in service to the public is to first find out what they are doing.  Sadly, that is where many citizens fall short.  However, it is easily remedied with a few properly placed questions.

What’s in your water?  Check out Environmental Working Group, a non-profit group whose mission is to empower people to live healthier lives in a healthier environment. We have no affiliation with the group but we have found their information very valuable, particularly their blogs on water.  EWG has done extensive analysis on water throughout the country and can provide an independent report on water in your area.  Check it out.

Get information about your water source …. then come to our spring and be confident that our water is the best you can get.

Soda Giant Reacts To Consumer Demand For Refillable Containers

Something old is suddenly new again.

You do not have to be a true tree-hugger to realize that we have a problem with plastic, particularly plastic bottles.  We have all seen them blowing down the street and, worse, floating in our oceans and lakes.  Left to slowly decompose in our water over many decades,  these plastics break down into micro-particals that make their way into the plant and wildlife …. then back to us.  Now, big soda makers are making their move, which we applaud but also send a word of caution.

Pepsi has been experimenting with placing Aquafina refilling stations in colleges so that students, many of whom are environmentally conscience, can refill their own bottles.  Coca Cola has been doing the same thing with its Dasani brand.  If it catches on, look for more machines, and fewer bottles.  Along the same line of thinking, Pepsi also announced that it is buying SodaStream … a vertical business decision to turn their plain water into a bubbly plain water.  You seen the trend?  Refilling your containers is the new black!

Sharing a small symbol of love at the spring

Pepsi and Coke can look for ways to fool consumers but those who visit Boston Clear know that their water travels up from the center of the earth, passes through a filter to assure any small debris don’t make it into your water, then it gets a flash of ultraviolet light to kill any bacteria, and then it goes into your jug.  You know the supply chain, all in about 50 feet from the source to your bottle, which is something you cannot say about the water from these behemoths who were the same ones who jumped on distributing water after people smartened up about the dangers of the soft drinks they peddled for years.  What makes you think these big companies have changed their ways?

We know that many people who visit our spring also support local farmer’s markets because they want to know where are food comes from.    We see a trend in the consumer wanting to understand how the products they ingest are brought to their plate (glass) … what is in what we consume … how does what we consume affect the environment … are the things we consume good for us?  Boston Clear checks all those boxes.

We are happy that the big companies are coming around to Boston Clear’s way of thinking, but we know that they will be unable to match our quality, sustainability and transparency.  We are both a water source and spiritual healing ground … something no big company can replicate.

Tell a friend that there is a new bottling experience trend that may be best experienced by stopping by to see us at 165 Lowell Street, Lynnfield, MA …. home of the Pocahontas Spring operated by Boston Clear.  A source of mineral water for hundreds of years!

 

The Lynnfield ZBA Meeting Is Tonight, Honoring Our Customers

Tonight is the Lynnfield Zoning Board of Appeals meeting regarding our spring and, more importantly, your ability to come to it for water.  While we intend to honor our spring by working to share it with all of you, we are there to honor your rights to come to our spring for its healing waters.

A few people have spoken out to restrict this site and that means a lot more people have to speak out about keeping the spring open.  We are confident in our ability to overcome these obstacles and in doing so have rediscovered our purpose in serving many of you.

As a result of the many letters and input that we have received, we are going to start a series of posts on the people who visit our spring.  We find many of your stories inspirational and visitors to our spring represent a special community of people who are committed to the movement of clean water.

Here is one of the letters we recently received in support of our spring that was also sent to the Zoning Board of Appeals (the author was kind enough to share the letter):

Dear Lynnfield Zoning Board,

Many years ago a good friend of mine told me about Pocahontas Spring in Lynnfield.  He explained the amazing taste, high quality and health benefits. Knowing that this person practices a healthy lifestyle and in his quest to be healthy to find the perfect water, he researched many different types of water and what is the best for our bodies; I buried it in the back of my mind knowing that one day this information would be of use to me.

About a year ago I decided to give it a try.  The water is so fresh and crisp it is like drinking water that flows from a glacier!  I was immediately addicted! For many years my liver was sluggish from all of the toxins and metals from tap and bottled water. My liver now feels great and I have lost 30 lbs.  I also believe that drinking from plastic water bottles is very toxic to our bodies and not very good for our earth.  I can’t even imagine how many plastic bottles are in our dumps and in our oceans!

Every week I drive to Lynnfield with 8 glass gallon jugs, and fill them and return

home to enjoy this wonderful water all week with my family of three and 2 cats.

I have tried to find another Spring similar to this in Florida where I will eventually live part-time.  It just does not exist!  We are so very, very lucky to have this Spring in Lynnfield. Honestly it is helping a lot of people for many health reasons.  When I fill my jugs, I am usually the only one there the property is so quiet and peaceful. I also take a peek at the Spring in the back and say thanks for this delicious and hydrating water.  This is a precious gift from nature to us, please allow the Spring to remain open.

  • Jeanne F.