The Value Of Mineral Water

We appreciate everyone who visits our spring in Lynnfield, particularly those who have taken the time to stop in our little red house that serves as our intergalactic headquarters.

Over the next few months, you will note that the price of our mineral water is going to increase. There are a number of factors that go into making such a decision but we are confident that the value for the quality is without equal.

Water is not created equal. In today’s mass market of bottled water, consumers can easily be confused as to the quality of the water and the claims made by the bottler. Nestle’s Poland Springs brand is now part of a class action lawsuit centered around the company’s misleading consumers about the quality of its “spring” water. You may have noted an increase in the commercials for Poland Springs as this lawsuit moves forward (We bet you start noticing). The fact is, the rules on labeling favor big corporations, not the consumer.

So what’s the difference in water? We found a good article from Consumer Reports that gives an unbiased look at the different kinds of water. Mineral water is different and our water is different from any other. First, you can taste the difference in our water and second, you can see the source for yourself.

We believe that the ritual of coming to our spring, taking a moment to be thankful for this natural source, and re-using containers are all part of a journey that more people will be making. There is hardly a week that goes by that we do not see something in the news about the poor quality of the water coming out of American homes’ faucets.

We believe that we should provide a space where people can show their thanks for the water. While you can do that as your bottle fills at our vending positions, we make the area next to our red house available to give you a place to reflect on this journey … something you may not get with a trip to your local grocery store. Reflection is as much part of our water as the water itself.

Many of you have also shared your stories of what the spring means to you and your family. Some of you have become hubs for water distribution within your network of family and friends. I am sure that your efforts are well worth it.

Finally, we want you to know how much we appreciate the stories many of you share with us. We hear you and we are noting them to add to our special history.

A Poem For Spring

Mary Richardson wrote to us at the spring last year as part of her move from Pennsylvania to Colorado Springs. Her reasons for the move were quite simple, access to clean water.

Nothing says “Spring” like a Spring … with flowers.

Richardson is a nurse but her the hospital where she worked pushed baby formula, mixed with ordinary water, on new mothers and their babies. She now works in a lactation nurse in a Baby Friendly, hospital. “Baby Friendly” was coined by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) who launched the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI), a global program to encourage the broad-scale implementation of the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding and the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes. The BFHI assists hospitals in giving mothers the information, confidence, and skills necessary to successfully initiate and continue breastfeeding their babies or safely feed with formula, and gives special recognition to hospitals that have done so.

Mary, who now lives in Colorado Springs in a place called the Garden of The Gods …. and she only drinks water from nearby Manitou Springs, a town that has a few mineral springs.

During a recent walk, Mary was inspired to write a poem about the Blue Bell flowers she saw …. I asked her if we could share it here “Homage to Blue Bells.”

Why do Bluebells hang their heads down low

Are they tired or sad allowing their tears to flow

Assisting their roots with water to grow

It’s very possible we may never know

Why do Bluebells stare down at the ground

As if in a dream or lost in a sound

Wild things roam and creatures abound

Perhaps the answer can never be found

Why do Bluebells not come up for air

As if the sun is no more their care

They seem content to just stand there

It’s beyond comprehension, life isn’t fair

Why do Bluebells have a hunch on their back

As if looking down is a natural act

Dusty floors, a wall with a crack

Only an earthworm gets a look at that

A world without Bluebells would be a sorrowful place

They remind us of gratitude and private space

Things of true beauty can often be traced

To a Bluebell’s mystery of hiding its face

Remembering Lucy Marie Smith Vazzana

At Boston Clear, we understand that we are part of a legacy of stewards who have watched over Pocahontas Spring for centuries. One of those stewards passed away earlier this month; Lucy Marie Smith Vazzana.

The Smith Family At Pocahontas Spring

Lucy was the daughter of Joseph F. and Della Alice Rich Smith. Starting in the early 1900s, it was Joseph who began selling water from our spring and delivering it all over around the North Store in horse drawn wagons. We were fortunate to hear a story from John Smith, brother of Lucy, who told us about water being drawn from the spring to help fight the Great Salem Fire of 1914.

Lucy was also kind enough to support Boston Clear in its recent dispute before the Lynnfield Zoning Board of Appeals that has since been settled. Lucy knew the heritage of the spring and its importance of it being a resource to be passed on for generations to come. We even got a direct note from Lucy on our website not long after we took over; “I am so proud of what you have done to the Pocahontas Spring! I am sure my father is looking down and smiling. Thank you for preserving this beautiful God-given natural resource.” We have always felt the presence of people like Lucy at the spring and am sure she is looking down at us with a smile as well.

Before moving to North Carolina to retire, Lucy was a special needs teacher and taught at several different schools around Lynnfield. She was a longtime member of the Lynnfield Congregational Church where she was the chairperson of the church prayer group. Lucy also served as president of the Lynnfield Flower Club. 

After moving to Ocean Isle Beach, NC more than 12 years ago, she became very involved in the Seaside United Methodist Church in Sunset Beach, and was a member of their prayer group. Lucy was someone who stayed active and enjoyed golf. She was a member of the Ladies Golf League of The Thistle Golf Club, the “Out to Lunch Bunch” at Ocean Ridge.

We are thankful for her stewardship, her grace in serving others and her support of our work. She will be missed and fondly remembered.

The Future Of Water

We are constantly monitoring the world of water.  While there is both good news about the drinking water on our planet, there is also troubling  news.  One thing that is for certain, there are changes coming.

As we head into 2019, we wanted  to share with you some  our observations on  water  issues.  You can follow us here throughout 2019 as we also adapt to the challenges of our changing planet.

Here is what to look for  in 2019:

  1. Tap Water Is Not Safe – Have you heard “They said the water  is safe.” Well, we need to know who “they” are and start pushing back.  In recent meetings with the Lynnfield Central Water District  (MA), management has told the residents the water is safe despite gray and dark water coming from the faucet.  In a contentious  meeting last week, LCWD faced angry residents who are concerned about their water.  LCWD proposed a multi-million water filtration system to solve the problem but residence wanted more information and requested a study.  The truth is, the study will likely lead to even more  expensive alternatives.  These types of meetings are taking place all over the  country as communities face the fact that our aging water systems cannot deliver quality/safe water to the faucet.
  2. Delivery of water is changing – For those of you who come to Boston Clear with your containers, you know how the delivery of  water  is changing.  For  years, we all drank out of the tap, then there was bottled water at the store,  now people are seeking out their own water supplies.  We appreciate your journey to our spring and offer a place to reflect on this wonderful resource, however the next delivery of water delivery system is evolving.  People are buying huge storage tanks and rely on tanker trucks to deliver their  water.  This is much like the home fuel oil delivery system we have today.
  3. The price of water is going to rise – Many of us never imagined paying $5 for a cup of coffee any more than we thought of buying a $2 bottle of water …  but here we are.  With water from the tap becoming more unreliable, clean water resources dwindling and hedge funds buying up  supplies (see #7 below), water is going to go up  in price.  We  noted a bottled mineral spring water at Whole Foods that is  being sold for $6.50/gallon.
  4. Plastic is out – Our oceans are filling up with plastic and the problem is driven by plastic containers,  particularly water.  It  is not uncommon for a single  person to go through 3-5 bottled waters each day.  Look for more refilling of containers and more studies  on the poison that seeps into  water from  plastic containers.  More glass please!
  5. Clean Ups Are Coming – After decades of polluting  and decades more deciding on legal responsibility /  price, cleanup of contamination on some sites will be coming.  The solution is going to involve taking ground water through filtration system, adding chemicals to treat the water, then pumping it back into the ground.  Will it work?  Time  will tell.
  6. The EPA is Behind – The EPA cannot keep  up with the  chemicals that are being dumped  into  the water.  People are flushing chemicals, pesticides, pharmaceuticals and trash.  A report by CNN  found that there are numerous chemicals in the water that are not even being tested for.  For those of you who love documentaries, we recommend What Lies Upstream … about a chemical spill into a river in West Virginia.  The people are poor and the politicians are enept. 
  7. Big Companies Are Buying Up Water Sources – Harvard, whose endowment is multi-billion dollars, has been getting into a new investment … water.  Hedge funds are buying  up  water supplies.  Even former president George W. Bush purchased thousands of acres in South America that contains a  large water aquifer.  
  8. What Happens Over There Will Happen Here  – We only  need to look at the challenges  in other countries to see what could come our way.  We say “could” because we think things can change if major reforms are undertaken.  However, in places like India, clean water is in such a shortage that towns often bring in tankers to allow people to access to safe water.
  9. Supply Chain Transparency – People want to know where the items they  consume come from.  Organic farm stands are popping up everywhere because consumers are concerned about pesticides and how their food is handled.  Your water should be no different.  Our water at Boston Clear comes from the spring, through a filter to remove any particles, then hit with a ultraviolet light for any possible organic matter.  Then  it goes  into  your bottle.  Keeping  it simple!
  10. Identifying Polluters  – Sometimes it takes decades for us to  know that a company has been poisoning the water.  One big polluter has been military bases …. look for many more disclosures and sad stories.

What Does “Water Safe To Drink” Mean? Some Found Out Too Late


After 34 years of waiting, the Environmental Protection Agency broke ground on a $40 million decontamination plant on an old paint company lot in the city of Industry, CA in the San Gabriel Valley.  The company responsible for the contamination was Northrop Grumman. This new facility, one of thirty-two recently built in the valley, takes contaminated water out of the water table and puts it through a process known as reverse osmosis before returning it to the water flood control canals … then back into the ground.  According to an article in the San Gabriel Vally Tribune, “The largest of three new plants, will treat five square miles of underground pollution and produce clean drinking water at a rate of 2,000 gallons per minute …”     But what is “clean drinking water?”

The San Gabriel Valley was hit particularly hard with pollution from industries that dumped toxins into the ground.  Five companies that were responsible for dumping chemical toxins that have decimated the water supplies in the area were Aerojet Rocketdyne, Inc.; Chemical Waste Management; Allied Waste Industries, Inc. (for Azusa Land Reclamation, Inc., a closed landfill on the Azusa-Irwindale border); Winco Enterprises, Inc (in care of Parker Hannifin Corp.); and Hartwell Corp.  They are now part of a massive cleanup project that has crippled water supplies in California which was already under pressure from decades of drought.

Northrop Grumman also has problems in other parts of the country.  It is now part of a federal lawsuit brought by a family in Long Island, NY, most of them stricken with rare cancers.  Their claim is that Grumman contaminated the water beneath them causing a “plume of toxins” that has expanded over the years.   While it was not uncommon for big companies to dump harmful chemicals into the land, what is just as reprehensible is that those who monitored the water supply informed residents that there were no dangers.  According to an article in the NY Post:

But it also dumped carcinogens on land which later became the community park — where kids like Christopher [now has cancer] spent years playing Little League and attending summer camp. Last year, officials found radon gas in Bethpage schools.

Authorities say Bethpage’s water is safe. But residents scoffed at a 2013 state Department of Environmental Conservation study which found Bethpage cancer rates were similar to surrounding areas.

Officials have monitored and treated local water and public drinking wells since the 1970s, said the DEC, which said the state expanded efforts, and is using new technologies, to battle “the plume.”

But as new carcinogens are identified, it casts doubt on past water remediation at the longtime Superfund site, said lawyer Nicholas Rigano, who reps the family.

Long Island has a number of non-profit initiatives set up to monitor water quality, identify contributors to pollution and promote grants to improve water quality.  It may be too late to save the tap water, but it is a start at preventing the pollution from spreading even further.

Even in New England, where water quality is a growing problem, we see municipal water providers claiming that the water is safe … but is it?  How do you know?  That is a difficult question to answer and people across the country are wondering if the water that comes from the tap is safe for consumption.  The quick answer is “no, tap water is not safe and I would not allow my family to drink it.”

The Environmental Protection Agency sets the standards for drinking water through the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (NPDWR).  One of the problems with the standard is that it lists 91 potential water contaminants that it regulates. But there are more than 60,000 chemicals used within the U.S., many of which have been identified as probable carcinogens. In addition, water run off and contaminates that are put into the sewage systems (flushed) present an unknown level of prescription drugs, disease and toxins that feed right back to water treatment facilities.  Those facilities treat the water with more chemicals then return them to consumers who drink at their own risk.

The Merrimac River, once a haven for sport fisherman, has experienced pollution problems because of heavy rains that cause sewage to be dumped into it.  According to a recent article in the Boston Globe:

Nearly 50 years after the Clean Water Act, the Merrimack has become one of the most polluted waterways in New England, one of dozens of rivers in the region that are repeatedly inundated with raw sewage from treatment plants overwhelmed by heavy rains … the Merrimack is expected to be deluged with an estimated 750 million gallons of sewage from the six treatment plants that feed into it — more than it has received in a decade…”

Our water systems are under extreme pressure and they are not going to get better anytime soon.  Get your drinking water from a known, reliable source where you can taste, see and feel the difference it can make in your life.  We’ll keep you informed here.

The Dwindling Supply Of Good Water On Our Planet

Let us start off by saying that our water is flowing pure and clear from the center of the earth here to our Boston Clear customers.  But we are fortunate.

As we in Massachusetts vote on Tuesday, consider your public officials’s stance on issues related to water.  While water is a national issue, its safety is best addressed at the local level where citizens can demand that their leaders do something beside issue statements that say our ‘water is safe to drink.’  If the water around the country is so clean, then why are so many people sick?!!!!

Each week we want to bring you information on water, not to scare you (though there is plenty to be scared about) but to inform you.   Through sharing stories of the struggles and the solutions surrounding the world’s clean water supply, we will solve this problem.

Water sources across the world, are under pressure from contaminates like lead, polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), manganese … that are all making people sick.  In many cases, people drink the water from the tap because that is all that they can afford, so the poorest among us are the ones getting the most contamination.  In the past, those testing water were looking for obvious contaminates, like lead, but now there are so many complex chemicals that have leeched into water supplies that are believed to cause high blood pressure, cancer and autism.

The contamination crisis of PFASs in the water is something that should concern a number of communities across the country.  According to Vice, PFAS are used in products to create items that are durable, heat resistance, and provide water- and oil-repellency. They can be found in carpet, apparel, fast food wrapping, non-stick substances, firefighting foam, and more. They are throughout the United States and, after decades of production, they have found their way into our bodies.

For many Americans, the phrase “water crisis” conjures thoughts of lead contamination in Flint, just a few hours’ drive northeast of Parchment. But increasingly, it’s also making them think of the chemicals countless drank—or may still be drinking—every day. From military bases to corporate waste sites, and in Michigan, Pennsylvania, Colorado and beyond, new awareness of PFAS pollution and its long-term effects has left Americans horrified at the unusually durable “forever chemicals” they’ve been ingesting for years.

Lead paint was believed to be the cause of poisoning people in generations past, but could it have been in our drinking water?   However, conditions like high blood pressure are up and a new study suggests that it could be linked to lead;

It’s possible that lead exposure from decades past is helping feed the growing epidemic of high blood pressure, said Sung Kyun Park of the University of Michigan School of Public Health, who led the study team.

“Lead is a widespread environmental toxicant. As you have seen in Flint and many other cities, there may be continued exposure,” Park told NBC News.

Michigan’s drinking water is worse than what we read about in Flint, MI, which breaks our hearts.  While lead was the culprit in Flint, it is only one part of the problem;

Michigan’s experience with emerging contaminants is a clarion call to a nation that has forgotten some critical lessons from the past.  In all corners of the state, experts see a family of chemicals, once ubiquitous around the globe for decades, now linked to a series of deadly cancers, thyroid, autoimmune, metabolic and neurologic diseases, along with decreased fecundity and endocrine disruption. 

In places like El Salvador, water crisis is leading to outbreaks in violence.  According to one local, “The well doesn’t produce a lot of water and when it dries up, we have had problems with people fighting.”  Of course they do and it is going to get worse.

In Gaza, a war-torn area of the Middle East, water contamination is likely going to lead to an epidemic.  Children will be hit first, then, as it creeps into the lives of adults they will revolt.  Battles with neighboring Israel will likely occur if the water crisis is not addressed.  Water, a source that once drove people to come together, could lead to fighting that will certainly drive us apart.

Water is necessary for our existence, but before we run out of water, we are going to resort to fighting over it and about it.  The quality of our water and how we protect it, could be the single source of peace in the world … something to think about today as we head into Thanksgiving.  This year, give thanks to clean water.

Come to our Hate Free Zone and enjoy some of the finest water in the universe.

America’s Battle For Clean Water Has No Easy Answer

We expect honesty from those in our government (we won’t get any more political  than that here).  However, when it comes to our safety, we expect both honesty and transparency.  Never has there been a time when we need both of these when we look at our water supply.

As Pocahontas Spring’s natural flow slows at this time of year before returning to its more robust self in a few weeks , we reflect on how special this amazing resource is to us.  When you taste the purity of our water, you will never want tap water … you will never want bottled water again!  However, when it comes to tap water, it is more than just taste, it is about safety.

Maxx loves the spring and those New England Patriots

In Newark, NJ, the city conducted an engineering study and found that measures to prevent lead from leaching into drinking water were failing at a treatment plant.  The New York Times described the problem as one approaching the level of Flint, MI.  However, officials stated on the city’s website, in all caps, that “NEWARK’S WATER IS ABSOLUTELY SAFE TO DRINK.”  Then mayor Ras Baraka clarified the statement saying “In fact, Newark has some of the best drinking water. The problem is that our infrastructure is not safe.”  WHAT?

Problems with water stretch to rural areas as well.  NPR reported in small Martin county Kentucky town on the West Virginia border, a place where you might think the water is so pure, but found contamination so bad that some teenagers have no memory of ever drinking water from the tap.  Just like in Newark, the problem is not that treatment plants are putting out contaminated water (though some add chemicals to make sure the water is “clean”), the problem is the delivery system of pipes.  According to a Gail Brion, a University of Kentucky professor who specializes in water infrastructure:

“The treatment plant operators can’t control the quality of the water in the pipes if they cannot keep the pipes intact.  This is really not on the water quality coming out of the plant. It is on what happens to the water as it goes through this leaky straw.” 

In Miami, the rising water associated with global warming (whether or not you think humans are to blame is not the point) is leading to a crisis in that major city.  According to Bloomberg, Miami-Dade is built on the Biscayne Aquifer, 4,000 square miles of unusually shallow and porous limestone whose tiny air pockets are filled with rainwater and rivers running from the swamp to the ocean. The aquifer and the infrastructure that draws from it, cleans its water, and keeps it from overrunning the city combine to form a giant but fragile machine. Without this abundant source of fresh water, made cheap by its proximity to the surface, this hot, remote city could become uninhabitable.

So what is the fix?  First, come to our spring and fill your glass containers.  But we realize that not everyone can do that.  The Environmental Protection Agency estimates it will cost the nearly $400 billion to repair the millions of miles of eroding pipe that is the main culprit of dirty tap water.  The money for that will mostly come from those who are on the main water supply that is run by a municipality or private companies with oversight from government regulators.  For places like Martin county, one of the poorest counties in the country, its residence may never be able to afford repairs and will be forced to purchase bottled water (also a big expense).

Locally, we have seen towns across New England that have encountered problems with tap water, including our own Lynnfield, MA.  These crises are often viewed as temporary after some action taken … then assurances that the water is safe.  This trend, sadly, is most likely going to continue because there are no easy answers.

What’s In Your Water?

Let’s start off by asking “What is in our water at Pocahontas Spring?”  The answer is “what Mother Earth put into it with the addition of fine filter to capture debris (don’t want rock parts in your water) and we hit it with a ultraviolet light to kill any bacteria.  Ultraviolet (or UV) light is a type of radiation. In simple terms, when any type of bacteria or microbe is directly exposed to certain types of UV light, the DNA (its fundamental building block) of the cell is damaged, preventing it from replicating. If a cell cannot reproduce, then the cell cannot cause infection, which is how UV light kills bacteria.  This does not affect the quality of the water (taste, smell, pH, alkaline or mineral makeup), it just kills the bacteria.  From there, the water goes out the vending spouts to your containers.

But water that goes through metropolitan treatment facilities, often have added chemicals, like chlorine and fluoride.  However, people are now concerned about the things that are being added to the water they drink.

Chlorination is the process of adding chlorine to drinking water to disinfect it and kill germs. Different processes can be used to achieve safe levels of chlorine in drinking water.   While the chlorine could be harmful in high doses, when it is added to water, they all mix in and spread out, resulting in low levels that kill germs but are still safe to drink.  The reason for adding chlorine is that the source of water that is being treated is a combination of a feed of water sources (lakes and streams) combined with runners off from sewers and land.  This means that treatment plants have a lot of stuff to kill before it gets to your house.  It also has to have enough chemicals in it to safely pass through pipes to residences.  To us, water like this is good for flushing and bathing, but not so good for drinking … but hey, we’re particular about our water.

Then there is fluoride.  The addition to fluoride, once hailed as an outstanding healthcare achievement since it was found to curb tooth decay, began being controversial in the 1950s.   Today, people have developed a number of theories, many of which have been debunked,  as to the dangers of the naturally found compound.  There is a big movement by many municipalities to have it removed from their water treatment, believing that it causes autism and a number of other negative health conditions.  The fact is, people want less added to their water.

When it comes to bottled water that you see in the store, there may be no chlorine or fluoride in the water but there may be something you never thought should be …. PLASTIC.  The perception of bottled water being clean and pure is being challenged by a global investigation that found the water tested is often contaminated with tiny particles of plastic.

A number of factors  are going to determine our fate as a planet, clean water is one of them.  We came across this  article in Wired that said climate change could impact the production / cost of beer!!!  Say it ain’t so!

There is also the issue of contaminants being purposely put into water sources that is meant to do no harm.  In Minnesota, they are using a chemical in lakes to get rid of the algae that is growing out of control … but some are skeptical as to whether or not it is harmful to those who later drink that water.  You decide, but we think when man tries to resolve one problem, he often creates two.

We prefer water from the earth, from deep within the earth.

Big Problems Require Big Thinking … Our Growing Population And How To Feed It

We have addressed, and will continue  to  address, the issues surrounding how we provide safe drinking water to people locally and nationally.  One of the issues that has caused our water problems has been the expansion of our population that has led  to pollution, loss of  clean water supplies and over use of  chemicals to treat an aging  infrastructure to deliver clean water.   The sheer size of the world’s population is posing  yet another problem, how to feed us  all.

In an exceptional  article in the  Washington  Post, Joel Achenbach says that one of the solutions to feeding the masses involves less reliance on meat  and the adoption of more fruits and vegetables (just  like your mom told you).  Looks like the vegan  lifestyle was more  practical than many of us thought … it is the future.  According to a report published in the journal Nature:

The food system is a major driver of climate change, changes in land use, depletion of freshwater resources, and pollution of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems through excessive nitrogen and phosphorus inputs. Here we show that between   2010 and 2050, as a result of expected changes in population and income levels, the environmental effects of the food  system could increase by 50–90% in the absence of technological changes and dedicated mitigation measures, reaching  levels that are beyond the planetary boundaries that define a safe operating space for humanity. We analyse several options for reducing the environmental effects of the food system, including dietary changes towards healthier, more  plant-based diets, improvements in technologies and management, and reductions in food loss and waste. We find that  no single measure is enough to keep these effects within all planetary boundaries simultaneously, and that a synergistic  combination of measures will be needed to sufficiently mitigate the projected increase in environmental pressures.
One driving factor of the pollution of the earth (and there are many) is the consumption of meat (poultry, beef and pork).  Achenbach’s assessment is that “… efforts to keep climate change at an acceptable level won’t be successful without a huge reduction in meat consumption.”  Eat your veggies.
Here are some other facts you  might find interesting (shocking):
  • Half the planet’s ice-free land surface is devoted to livestock or the growing of feed for those animals, Richardson said. That’s an area equal to North and South America combined
  • Some 70 percent of the world’s fresh water is already used in agriculture
  • Rising income in China and many other formerly impoverished countries brings with it a higher demand for meat and other forms of animal protein
  • The current food system is incredibly wasteful, with about a third of the food produced eventually being discarded because of spoilage
  • About 3 billion people are malnourished today and 1 billion of them suffer from food scarcity

Changes in how we treat our planet will come about by either careful planning or necessity.   I think we know which one is preferred.

Here Is What We Are Working On … And There’s Plenty

THANK YOU!  THANK YOU!  THANK YOU!

We are so appreciative of the support everyone showed during our Lynnfield Zoning Board of  Appeals meeting on October 2.  We prevailed at the hearing and many of you got to speak on behalf of our spring.  We know you had other things to do  and greatly appreciate your taking the time to attend.  Now our work continues.

Our goal is to provide our wonderful water to you and to educate you on what we see are challenges to water supplies around the world.  While we note challenges, we also want to provide solutions.  As we  carry out our mission, we will continue to be focused on writing here on the following issues:

Our Spring – We provide updates on our spring and share the stories of the people who visit it.  Our articles contain hyperlinks to the sources of our stories … NO FAKE NEWS HERE!   We know that people who visit  our website and spring have interest in water and conserving our planet … so we turn you on to news and resources  that keep  you informed.   Here is a good article we found on Indians who have no drinking  water when there is a Nestle water bottler nearby!  It is stories like this that we want to bring to your attention.

The Retail Water Markets – We know that you pass through shopping markets and see water labeled as “spring,” “mineral,” “pure,” etc.  But what we continue to read about mislabeling of water that is nothing more than filtered/chemically treated water. Lawsuits against giants Nestle and LaCroix provide a disturbing look into what goes into water that many people drink each day.  Whether people enjoy these water products for convenience or safety (public water supplies are another problem) they trust that these companies and the government organizations that provide oversight will provide a safe product.  This may not be the case.

Quality of Our Public Water – We are the first  to admit that Boston has done a lot to clean up the harbor and rivers … but it probably had nowhere to go but up!  Boston Harbor is the cleanest it has been in decades and the The Charles River is almost swimmable (not that we would recommend that).  However, each week we seem to see problems with local water supplies … like in Stoneham,

Plastics And Our Oceans – Our oceans are in trouble.  Plastics, overfishing and pollution spilling into the oceans is killing our most abundant resource … WATER!  Again, some of these issues  hit close to home like this story of seals dying along our coast earlier this year.  The specific reasons for this type of damage are not known, but it is clear that it has to do with our continued mistreatment of our oceans.  For our part, our business model is based on reusing containers (preferably glass) through vending refills.  This eliminates millions of plastic bottles from our landfills and oceans.

Saving Our Planet – We believe that our  spring provides a way for people to connect with the earth.   It is more than just saving our planet from pollution, it is about getting to know more about the planet so we care enough to save it.  To some, our spring has been a place of spiritual enrichment and others a place to meditate in a busy world.  There is a spiritual awakening going on around the country and we see it everyday at Boston Clear.

Whatever your reasons for visiting our  spring, we thank you.  We thank you for sharing your stories and stopping by to talk to us in the office.  We thank you for your support and we look forward to serving future generations the finest water in the galaxy!